About

AFTER (Affordable Fire, Tornado and Earthquake Resistant) Homes Foundation is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization established in 2012 with the Mission Statement:

Providing safe, affordable, and sustainable concrete dome housing and other structures for people in need throughout the world.

The AFTER Homes Foundation promotes monolithic concrete dome structures which:

ARE RESISTANT TO FIRES, TORNADOES, AND EARTHQUAKES

These unique, concrete dome structures are substantially safer than conventionally built structures, and are better able to withstand severe environmental conditions, including fires, earthquakes and tornadoes. The durable steel reinforced concrete shell exterior does not burn, its strength and shape resist tornado force winds, and its monolithic, all-in-one integrated structural design provides much greater resistance to earthquakes than conventional construction types.

REQUIRE AS LITTLE AS 6 TO 8 WEEKS TO BUILD A HOME

Construction of a concrete dome home can be completed much faster than a conventionally built structure, and often at a lower cost. When you consider homes located in areas affected by fires, tornadoes and earthquakes, the cost becomes lower over time, because this structure only has to be built only once. Wood-framed homes and other structures are not as able to survive the force of a tornado without significant damage, as we have frequently seen in recent years. Monolithic concrete AFTER Homes are better able to survive, and to protect its inhabitants in areas prone to fires and earthquakes as well.

CAN BE USED TO BUILD HOMES, SCHOOLS, CHURCHES, AND STRUCTURES AS LARGE AS SPORTS ARENAS

The unique dome shape of an AFTER Home is more in tune with nature and has a wonderful, tranquil quality about it. The homes are versatile, too, with many floor plans for both single and multifamily residences available.

An AFTER Home shelter can be added to your current residence to provide a storm shelter which can also be used as a bedroom suite, family room, recreation room or home office.

A monolithic concrete dome is not limited to smaller applications. There is virtually no limit regarding a dome’s size, and can be a beautiful and logical solution in the building of public structures (churches, schools, concert halls, auditoriums and sports arenas).

ARE ECO-FRIENDLY, REQUIRE APPROXIMATELY 50% OF THE ENERGY REQUIRED FOR HEATING AND COOLING OF A WOOD FRAME HOME, AND LAST INDEFINITELY

A concrete dome home is in fact a reinforced concrete structure that is expected to last as long as any other reinforced concrete structure would; potentially for hundreds of years. Its longevity conserves the earth’s resources. Also, the energy efficient nature of concrete domes makes this type of structure very cost efficient to operate, requiring much less energy for heating and cooling. Concrete domes have a high thermal mass, so that the temperature of the concrete remains more constant than wood or steel construction. The insulation of a monolithic concrete structure is outside of the high thermal mass concrete, keeping its temperature more constant and protecting the building’s interior from the daily and seasonal fluctuations of outside temperatures.

INCORPORATE LITTLE OR NO WOOD AND ARE RESISTANT TO MOLD AND TERMITES

There is very little or no wood used in the construction of an AFTER Home, thus AFTER Homes have no mold or termite issues, making them even more environmentally friendly. For families who have allergy issues, an AFTER Home can provide a healthier solution. Global deforestation is a worldwide problem, potentially making the earth less habitable with each passing day. Trees do not need people to survive, however people must have plants and trees to utilize carbon gases and to provide oxygen for us. Building construction is currently one of the greatest utilizers of wood, even though wood is not a good building material due to its susceptibility to deterioration by moisture, mold, and termites, its ability to easily burn, its fragility against tornadoes and earthquakes, and its inability to create buildings which are easily heated and cooled. So why are we still using so much wood?